Biograph Review

03-197207XX-07Hello dears, here I am again, to tell you all about future delights and titilations in store for you all at the Biograph.

But first let me tell you a bit about the little holiday I had in Paris last week. It was seven days of blissful relaxation in that beautiful city. Mind you, a couple of odd things did happen. An acquaintance had told me about a cinema I might enjoy whilst over in Paris, saying that I would hardly be able to tell the difference between the jolly old Bio and the place he was recommending. The cinema is called the Mexico and it is in the Porte St Martin quarter. So on the second day of my stay I paid it my first visit.

Very nice too it was. Just like home. Lots of nice re-runs, ever so crowded too. It really was amazing how the Mexico’s clientele were so similar to London’s equivilant. Same familiar strange habits too. It possibly has something to do with its close proximity to the Gare du Nord, as I sometimes feel the nearness of Victoria plays an important part in the restlessness of the clientele of the Biograph.

At the Mexico, they provide a rest room just to the left under the screen, supposedly for people who do not want to strain their eyes for long periods. (Very thoughtful, why not follow their example Bio management.) I tried to get in, but it was so dark and crowded that I soon gave up. Of course, when I got back to my seat someone had pinched it. Cheeky! Nice place generally though, if you can take the Bio’s strange diversions to begin with. After the Bio it made a nice home from home.

Nearly had a nasty incident at a convenience near the Gare de Lyon. I had had, I’m sorry to admit dears, one or two Pernods too many one evening, and was dying to relieve myself. So I eventually found this strange looking iron convenience, but what a queue there was I waited nearly half-an-hour, and was I hopping, and with my best Take 6 trendy suit on too. Anyway, there I was waiting when suddenly the whole place was alive with Gendarmes, who rudely pushed through the small crowd, and into the metal pre-war mausoleum, reappearing a few moments later with a handcuffed bunch of extremely distraught citizens. Well how would you like to be interrupted? Whatever they were up too I don’t know, if anything at all other than Nature’s callings, but I suppose there must be some Parisian by law that states how long you can stay in one place. The only good to come out of the incident was the thrill of having a Gendarme standing guard outside of the place when I finally managed to gain access.

Enough of my ramblings though, what you want is my thoughts on future delights playing at the Bio. Whilst I was away I missed seeing that little angel Michael York in Zepplin. As I said before, not much of a film but I could watch Michael for hours as he does his little thing on the screen. Another goody I missed was The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer. Strange surname don’t you think? Please write to me care of this paper if you can throw any light on what it means. Julian’s intrigued.

Anyway, back to the coming treats that are in store for us all. On Thursday 27 July Jealousy, Italian Style with Monica Vitti is showing, along with The Buttercup Chain with little Jane Asher and that dish Hywell Bennett. The latter is a little charm, with both the stars performing well together.

Sunday fare on 30th July has Paul Newman impressing in that exciting thriller Moving Target. I’ve seen this twice before and it still sends shivers down my, excuse me, spine. To tell the truth though, I’ve always been a little ‘biassed’ towards Paul Newman. Support is the instantly forgetable In a Colt’s Shadow.

Charge Up The Light Brigade shows for three days commencing on Monday 31st July. Stiff upper-lip Trevor Howard and gorgeous Vanessa Redgrave play leading roles in this historical epic, complete with surprises such as the occassional animated sequences. Not a bad picture, well worth a visit. Support is Loving, which I haven’t seen before. I shall pass no comment for now and will hope for the best.

That lovely little boy, David Bradley appears in Kes on Thursday 3rd August. Such a nice boy, even though I couldn’t understand a word he was saying when I saw this previously. The Last Warrior is the second feature, with weather beaten Anthony Quimm showing all he’s got to offer, as an actor that is.

Dear old Henry Fonda acts his heart out in Big Deal at Dodge City on Sunday 6th August. They don’t make westerns like this anymore. Lots of action, guns blazing and men dropping their like flies. Two for The Guillotine is also on the bill. Connie Stevens and Cesar Romero are the actors who find themselves in this rather queer situation. I do love that Connie Stevens, do you remember her from that interminable TV series on the commercial channel a few years ago? Exquisite little voice she used to have.

Henry Fonda turns up again in There Was A Crooked Man on Monday 7th August. Wonder what the title means? Bent goings on no doubt. I must make a point of seeing this as I have missed it at past showings at the Bio. Kirk Douglas plays with Henry in this drama.

Before I leave you let me just say a word about a couple of future attractions. Brotherhood of Satan, followed a few days later by Not With My Wife You Don’t, which features drag star Tony Curtis, are forthcoming goodies not to be missed.

Bonjour and Bonne Nuit for now. Love and Kisses to you all.

For The Biograph programme see Classifieds Page 11.

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