Still At It

LONDON: It was reported in GN13 that Chelsea police were using agent provocateur methods of entrapment in the vicinity of The Coleherne public house in London’s Earls Court district. We reported in that issue that Michael, a 34-year-old carpenter, had been fined £25 for mistakenly inviting a plainclothes police sergeant back to his home.

Unfortunately we have to tell you that the police are still at it.The latest victim of this widely condemned practise of using agents provocateurs, is Peter, a 26-year-old German student. For at Marlborough Street magistrate court recently, a police officer claimed that Peter had approached him and two other men in Coleherne Road and had extended invitations to go back to his flat.

Peter at first denied the offence, but later pleaded guilty and was conditionally discharged for twelve months. The German student, of excellent previous character, said in his defence that in Germany it was in no way illegal to extend such invitations in the street, and that he was not aware that the law was different in this country. He most certainly is now.

The Chelsea police must be using some very attractive guardians of the law to protect the public from these major crimes. So be extra careful about who you are friendly to in this particular area.

Further developments in this pitiful situation will appear in the paper.

Watch Out

LONDON: Although denied by the police that the practice of using agents provocateurs in Earl’s Court is happening at all, it is apparently becoming standard police procedure in that area.

The scene of these activities, which have been widely condemned, is in Wharfedale Street, which runs directly behind the popular Colherne public house. A GN newsman had heard rumours that plainclothes police officers would be in action behind the pub after ‘closing time’. This information came from two, usually reliable, independent sources, both of whom overheard the conversation of a group of five plainclothes officers.

The rumours turned into reality, for in court last week, a 34-year-old carpenter admitted persistently importuning men for a homosexual purpose. He was fined £25.

Sergeant William Smith told magistrate Mr John Hooper that after speaking to two men in Wharfedale Street, Michael (the carpenter) then approached him and asked, “Do you want to come back to my place ?”

“You weren’t in uniform, I take it?” the Marlborough Street magistrate asked him. Supposedly not, and Sergeant Smith sounds as if he must be rather attractive.

When asked by Gay News if agent provocateur methods would be a regular occurence from now on in Wharfedale Street, the station officer of Chelsea Police Station first replied, “I don’t know what you’re talking about”.

After having the question explained in more simplistic terms, he then stated, “These methods aren’t being used. Apart from that, there’s no comment I can make”

Gay News ventures to suggest that those people who may be in Wharfedale Street, or the near vicinity, late at night, should take the utmost precautions to ensure that they are not entrapped by these dubious means.

Any developments in this situation will appear in this paper.

Spying In Cubicles

I feel I must write to warn any readers who use the cottage on Wandsworth Common, to take care, as this place is under constant surveillance by the police.

A few weeks ago I was there and I noticed two men going in and out. I followed a boy in and stood next to him. The two men were still in and out, and I presumed they were gay as they were obviously trying to attract attention. They eventually went into the two cubicles behind the stalls. As it was quiet and no one else about, the boy and I started masturbating each other. After a few minutes both men came out of the cubicles and said they were police officers, and charged us both with gross indecency.

We were hustled into the police Rover between policemen, and had a motor cycle escort to the police station even crossing the red traffic lights, this made me feel a real criminal, I can tell you!

After taking particulars, we were moralised on our behaviour in public places. About how they had had complaints, and especially young children who might go into the toilet. I don’t know who complained, as there were hardly any people about that afternoon, and I didn’t see one child. We were also asked if we had ever considered having treatment, as if we had a disease. Shades of ‘Clockwork Orange’!

We both appeared before the SW Magistrates Court. I was fined £100, and given a three year prison sentence (suspended) and again moralised by the magistrate about our behaviour in public places, frequented by good, normal upstanding citizens.

This sentence has really upset me, and goes to show how banal the present law is, and an utter waste of police time and public money in trying to get a conviction of an unsuspecting gay, when they should be out looking for genuine crime and criminals.

As I am not sufficiently liberated, I must withold my name and address. Lots of love to all, especially Julian, and thanks for a marvellous paper.

Cottaging

Reprinted, with thanks, from Gay Arrow, Reading Gay Alliance’s Newssheet.

Bernard Greaves of Gay Cambridge made something of a name for himself when he took on both the police and the town council in the local paper, exposing their dubious attempts to catch homosexuals ‘at it’ in the cottages (public conveniences).

Since his campaign, council workers have filled in police spy holes.

The incident has given Bernard a greater understanding of ‘cottaging’ as a phenomenon. Now he writes controversially on his findings in a special article for Gay Arrow.

Police harrassment and entrapment of homosexuals in public lavatories appears to be getting more frequent. Or it may be that as the gay community becomes more organised through bodies such as CHE and GLF, and as communications improve, we are merely becoming more aware of it.

When I encountered this kind of police activity in Cambridge about eighteen months ago I was so outraged by the blatant intrusion into the privacy of people, all people not just gay people, using the toilets that I felt compelled to expose the methods of the police, and bring their activities in this field to an end.

It was only later, particularly when I began to be accused of “defending cottaging” that I began to appreciate some of the more general issues raised.

People cottage for a variety of different reasons. The most obvious is that it is the only means they have of meeting other men for sex. So long as homosexuals are oppressed by society and remain hidden this will continue. It is also anonymous and therefore, in spite of the risks, is regarded as safe. Unlike a gay club or bar there is always a perfectly legitimate excuse for one’s presence to satisfy acquaintances met by chance. Some men travel 30 or more miles by car to cottage to increase their feeling of safety and in the hope that if they are arrested the case will not be reported in their local papers. These people are often utterly respectable with good jobs, wives and children. They have a lot to lose, and this seems to them the safest way of satisfying their homosexual desires.


Other Reasons

But there are other reasons for cottaging too. For some the risk, the dangers, and the semi-public setting enhance their sexual excitement. For some cottaging has become an engrained behaviour pattern in which the ritual behaviour routines and the stench of stale urine have by long association become a trigger to sexual arousal. Many of these people are regular cottagers turning up night after night and whose consequent knowledge of one another has led to the development of a friendly social atmosphere.

No Commitment

In sexual terms these variations have one thing in common. The encounters are casual, anonymous and involve no emotional commitment. It is sex without affection, and without the responsibilities of a lasting relationship. On these grounds it is often condemned, in my view quite wrongly. For it fulfills deep-seated needs that are not going to be eradicated by the emancipation of homosexuals. Cottaging is too complex to be dismissed with simplistic moral judgements.

It needs a deeper understanding as a phenomenon and a more humble sympathy with those who practice it. Whatever the homosexual’s role in society, it will not disappear. Some men will always find the sight of another’s penis arousing.

Rule Britannia

19720914-05The Cottage, Regents Park

My Lords,

You have made a notable contribution to the moral health of your countries. “International News” is ever so national.

Gazing out of my cottage the other day, I saw what I took to be a painted harlot approaching the cottage. But something was dangling from her, something suspiciously like a truncheon.

I removed myself with deftness via the opposite end of the cottage only to see another painted human. Also, his Inspector had not inspected him. His glossy hair was depressed in a positive circle, indicating years of helmet-wearing. No need to look at his feet. The painted harlot now leered bewitchingly from the cottage enticing me to return. “No,” I said in my innocence: “Flirt with the one inside there.”

A voice, high and lacking resonance, surprised me as it whispered in my ear: “Take care, they’re cops, ducks. It’s the newest police game. You don’t have to do anything. Just be in there and two cops will swear your life away.”

“You know them?” I asked. “You can’t know all of them” the high-pitched whisper replied. “But what if I want to piss?” I asked.

“Makes no difference, ducks,” he answered with manly confidence: “You can’t have an honest piss anywhere. It’s government policy, police policy, House of Lords policy. That’s why so many people have made the atavistic plunge back over time and are pissing in the streets. I mean, like, it’s a bit stiff, twenty-five pounds a squirt. Even women don’t pay a penny now. So it’s full drag, burst your bleedin’ bladder, or piss in the street. But they do say the rear offside wheel of something is legal. Why, there’s a police car standing unattended over there.”

My kind friend went on the path of duty.

Your lordships will be delighted to know that the tiled palaces will continue to remain sterile and constantly, frequently, frequented only by those overstretched coppers – now painted.

Do take care how you pass this round, even in the Lords Cottage. A bit of ermine may well conceal a copper. Other devices are misleading. One is actually a truncheon.

Rule Britannia, Love and kisses,
Lu-Lu

To Their Noble Lordships

  • Reed
  • Morris of Borth-y-Gest
  • Diplock
  • Simon of Gladale
  • Kilbrandon

Constables in Leather

04-197208XX 03I thought you might be interested to hear of intense police harassment in this city. We have just got a new Chief Constable, who is reputed to have pledged himself to “clean up” the city.

Police are keeping an almost continuous watch on ‘gay’ toilets in Glasgow. They have young police constables in jeans and leather jackets ‘trolling’ around. After dark they have police hiding among the bushes in Maxwell Park. If two chaps as much as sit down on a park bench together they are questioned. If you park your car in certain places your number is taken.

As everyone knows this is a city which is notorious for crimes of violence, no doubt the police find it easier to persecute the persecuted, rather than doing their proper job of preventing the serious crimes, which take place all the time now. It’s no wonder that true criminals never get caught when the police are ‘not available’.

Danger! Police At Work

02-197206XX 3All the cottages in battersea Park are under continual surveillance by the police (plain clothed), and a guy was recently arrested at the popular one by the athletics track. After arrest by a plain-clothes-man he was taken to the superintendent of the park, so that in future he would be easily recognisable. When he appeared in court he sentanced to three months imprisonment, was fined £100 (for a first offence!), also suspended for three years, and banned from battersea Park for one year. Another guy, for whom it was a second offence, was fined £400. (All at the magistrates court, Lavender Hill, where there is a virtual stream of similar ‘offenders’.

So DON’T GO TROLLING IN BATTERSEA PARK COTTAGES – or if you do, you know what to expect.