Secret Dossier On Gay Teachers

The police have openly admitted keeping secret dossiers on schoolteachers whose private lives they think to be ‘corrupt’. And they are angry that they cannot act against these teachers.

In a recent issue of The Police Review, the semi-official organ of Britain’s policemen, the magazine complained that police involved in this private-lives work did not have enough legal protection.

The magazine said: “It may be that the information – in police possession – would not support a prosecution; it may not even relate to a chargeable offence, or it may be a matter of strong suspicion without proof.

“In one force, a schoolteacher was seen frequently loitering near public toilets and another was known to have a private library of obscene books.”

What the big-brother cops do usually is to report on this sort of nasty habit to the education authority that employs the teacher only if he (the teacher) commits a criminal offence.

What they don’t like is the fact that if the reports were made without a prosecution the teachers could sue the public eyes for libel.

The magazine adds on the cottaging teacher and the one who had a library of wank-material: “As there was no prosecution in either case, one presumes that the (education) authority remains unaware and the teachers continue to be in charge of young people.”

The Police Review stretches its moral tests to take in foster parents, adoptive parents and medical staff.

But in a rare flash of fairness The Police Review says it isn’t fair to wreck someone’s career by whispering in his employers’ ear. That, the magazine says, would be “contrary to natural justice.”

Instead what the police would like to do, it says, is to take the ‘deviant’ public employee aside and make him an offer he can’t refuse, so he either changes his behaviour or resigns.

Somehow the magazine has forgotten entirely the old forgotten rule of British justice that you’re not guilty until proved so.

Gay News Goes Under The Counter

LONDON: Kensington police sent out an inspector early the other day to make sure the newsagents on their patch weren’t selling anything naughty, so Gay News went under the counter at several newsagents, even though the paper is on no-one’s list of proscribed publications.

The National Newsagents’ Association has told its members to be cautious about displaying Oz Comix, Curious Male, In Depth and several other publications, but not IT, which currently has a phallic front cover, or GN.

All the same, after the visit from the Kensington police heavy whose job seems to go through newsagents’ magazine racks, some of the newspapers that are as yet unaffected by any back lash action have disappeared from police sight to be sold on request only.

Seized

GLASGOW: A street-seller for the City’s Black Box alternative newsagency was arrested for a breach of the peace for selling IT, Gay News and Black Box’s own paper, Spike.

The seller the police arrested was Leslie Twycross. Galsgow’s Provost is reading all three papers to see if there’s anything worth busting him any more on.

Earlier this year a Black Box seller was arrested for selling IT and another alternative paper. The provost could find nothing wrong with them.

Kemp Bashing

19721001-03LONDON: Mime artist Lindsay Kemp was beaten up in his home when he got home from the premiere of Ken Russell’s Savage Messiah, in which he has a role.

And when the police arrived they found the ends of cannabis cigarettes in an ashtray, and Mr Kemp ended the night being interviewed about the drugs by Scotland Yard drugs squad men.

He said afterwards: “It all happened after I returned from the premiere – and it was the worst night of my life.

“I called in the police in the first place because I genuinely thought a man was trying to murder me – a man had too much to drink and just went beserk.

“I was covered in blood and in a terrible state when I barricaded myself in one of my rooms and called Scotland Yard from an extension after the main phone had been tom out from its socket.

“I’ve gone through an awful experience – confronted with a hammer and cut about the body. I had also seen my flat wrecked.

“By the time the police arrived it had quietened down and there seemed no cause for alarm.

“Then the police spotted about half-a-dozen roaches (cannabis dog-ends) in an ashtray.

“I told them I certainly hadn’t smoked them. In fact I’m not at all interested in drugs myself, although I don’t disapprove of people smoking cannabis, which I consider far less harmful than alcohol.”