Dealings In Corruption

SUPER FLY. Director: Gordon Parks. Music: Curtis Mayfield. Stars: Ron O’Neal, Carl Lee. Distributor: Columbia Warner.

As Sounder was a superb piece of feeling, creative film making on Black oppression, Super Fly is a well polished, ideologically rather destructive, Black chauvinist piece of entertainment, produced primarily for the vicarious American youth market.

Super Fly is the ‘Priest’ (Ron O’Neal), leader of a cocaine trafficking mafiosa, he drives an enormous black Cadillac with a massive front bonnet and crest, which are frequently blown up by the camera, to symbolise his prowess and infallibility; he always wins whether in combat with a fellow black, or whites, who are inevitably corrupt.

The ‘Priest’ decides that he wants to get out of the Drug trade, but in order that he can carry on living in the style of luxury to which he has become accustomed, he will arrange one more massive deal worth a million dollars, and then retire comfortably. This is the start of unending double dealings, most of which are perpetuated by the deputy commissioner of police, who appears to be running the New York drug trade.

Despite all adversities, the Priest triumphs and gets his money. The purist ideology aside, this is quite an entertaining, fast paced thriller, with superb music by Curtis Mayfield (previously reviewed in GN), which greatly adds to the film’s urgency and vitality. The location photography nicely dispels any ideas we still might have, that New York is a rich, clean, glamourous paradise.

One distinguished film critic was heard to remark, after the press show — “Why don’t they make a sequel called Super Jew, about a theatrical agent?”

Films all reviewed by David Seligman.

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David Seligman

David Seligman was a founder of both Gay News and of the London Lesbian and Gay Switchboard.
David Seligman
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Author: David Seligman

David Seligman was a founder of both Gay News and of the London Lesbian and Gay Switchboard.

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